The other two people diagnosed with autism received the MMR vaccine, but no specific exposure was associated with behavioral symptoms.

The patient who was diagnosed with autism or disinsection, the MMR vaccine was associated with deterioration in behavior, and was also reported to have had a slower development after previous exposure to the monovalent measles vaccine.
The period between suspected exposure and the first clinical and behavioral symptoms ranged from 24 hours to 2 months, with a median of 1 week.
Of the eight patients who identified MMR as exposure related exposure, five showed early side effects (fever, rash, convulsions).

In the 1990s, new vaccines were added to the plan due to the success of vaccine research and development.
In 2006, the American Academy of Family Physicians and the Advisory Committee on Vaccination Practices of Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) for infants and infants recommended nine vaccines for a total of 13 diseases.
Currently, 10 vaccines against 14 diseases are recommended (except tetanus and influenza vaccines).

November 16, 2009, Cdc publishes health report 2009 pandemic update h1n1: Pneumococcal vaccine is recommended to prevent secondary infection.
On October 21, 2009, Merck announced that he would refrain from producing monovalent measles, mumps and rubella vaccines.
On October 16, 2009, the FDA approved a new vaccine (Cervarix, GlaxoSmithKline) to prevent cervical cancer.

On July 8, 2011, the FDA approves Boostrix (TDAP, GlaxoSmithKline) for preventing tetanus, diphtheria and pertussis in the elderly.
On May 19, 2011, the CDC honored vaccination as one of the ten public health achievements of the first decade of the 21st century in its Weekly Morbidity and Mortality (MMWR) report.
On April 22, 2011, the FDA approved the first vaccine (Menactra, a meningococcal conjugate vaccine, Sanofi Pasteur) for preventing meningococcal disease in infants and young children.
On December 22, 2010, the FDA approved the Gardasil HPV vaccine to prevent anal cancer.

On November 20, 2012, the FDA approved the first seasonal influenza vaccine produced using cell culture technology (Flucelvax, Novartis).
On October 24, 2012, ACIP agreed to use HibMenCY (Menhibrix, GlaxoSmithKline), a new combination vaccine (meningococci and Hib), in infants at increased risk of meningococcal disease.
On June 24, 2012, the FDA approved HibMenCY (Menhibrix, GlaxoSmithKline), a new combined vaccine (meningococcal and Hib) for infants.

On January 12, 2018, Cdc published acip recommendations on the use of a third dose of mmr during a mumps outbreak.
On January 11, 2018, the FDA approves an extended childhood indication for Fluarix Quadrivalent for influenza.
October 20, 2017. FDA approval of Shingrix, a new vaccine against GlaxoSmithKline herpes zoster, for use in adults over the age of 50 years.

The first vaccines purchased were Hib, hepatitis B, rotavirus and pneumococci, which were not widely used in developing countries.
On December 21, 1998, Recombinant OspA from Lyme (LYMErix from SmithKline Beecham) was approved for use between 15 and 70 years of age.
August 31, 1998 Rotavirus vaccine (RotaShield Wyeth) was approved for use in infants aged 2, 4 and 6 months old.
On July 29, 1998, an adsorbed vaccine against diphtheria and tetanus toxoid and pertussis pertussis (Certiva from North American Vaccine) was approved for the initial and refreshing immunization of infants and children (except for the fifth dose in children who had previously received 4 doses of DTaPmill).

On January 29, 1997, diphtheria and tetanus toxin, as well as adsorbed cell-free pertussis vaccine (Infanrix from Smithkline Beecham) were approved for the first four doses in this series.
In January 1997, ACIP recommended the use of another series of two doses of IPV followed by two doses of OPV for all infants and children to reduce the incidence of VAPP (paralytic paralytic paralytic) after oral administration. Live polio virus vaccine was detected.
On September 27, 1996, the combined DTaP and Hib vaccine (TriHIBit from Aventis Pasteur) was approved for the fourth dose of the DTaP and Hib series.
On July 31, 1996, diphtheria and tetanus toxins, as well as pertussis vaccine adsorbed by Aventis Pasteur (Tripedia) were approved for the initial and refreshing immunization of infants.

Common side effects: Similar to previously described vaccines for the prevention of diphtheria, tetanus, pertussis, polio and Hib.
Similar to previously described vaccines for the prevention of diphtheria, tetanus, pertussis, polio and Hib.
Tell your doctor beforehand: For diphtheria, tetanus, pertussis, polio and Hib vaccines, see sections.

Common side effects: Similar to previously described vaccines for the prevention of diphtheria, tetanus, pertussis and polio.
Similar to previously described vaccines for the prevention of diphtheria, tetanus, pertussis and polio.
Tell your doctor beforehand: For diphtheria, tetanus, pertussis and polio vaccines, see sections.
For diphtheria, tetanus, pertussis and polio vaccines, see sections.

Common side effects: Similar to previously described diphtheria, tetanus, pertussis, hepatitis B and polio vaccines.
Similar to previously described vaccines for the prevention of diphtheria, tetanus, pertussis, hepatitis B and polio.
Tell your doctor beforehand: For diphtheria, tetanus, pertussis, hepatitis B and polio vaccines, see sections.